Exhibition: John Akomfrah, ‘Purple’. The Curve, Barbican

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British-Ghanaian artist and filmmaker John Akomfrah presents his latest commissioned work, Purple, at The Curve in Barbican Centre. The piece follows on the heels of Akomfrah’s Vertigo Sea (2015), which showed at the 56th Venice Biennale, as the second chapter of a planned quartet of films investigating ‘the aesthetics and politics of matter’. Both works feature multi-channel video installations that use archival footage, from both his personal collection and collections at the British Film Institute and Natural History, scored with ambient sound as well as sound from the archival imagery.

In contrast with the singular emphasis of the ocean in Vertigo Sea, Purple takes an expansive look at the anthropomorphic effects on the planet. The six-movement installation documents and catalogues the effects of climate change on ‘human communities, biodiversity, and the wilderness.’ Akomfrah uses footage from locations as far-flung as the Greenland in the Arctic and the Marquesas Islands in the South Pacific to form hidden relationships between the climate change, plastification of the ocean, and ‘the memory of ice.’ In his words, John Akomfrah said; “The challenges ahead of us, of how we treat the planet and relate to matter and beings are daunting and hyperreal. I hope these works contribute in a small way to some of the very necessary conversations we need to have about the uncertain roads ahead.”

Born in 1957, Accra, Ghana, Akomfrah lives and works in London. He as a founding member of the Black Audio Film Collective (1982–1998) and his work continues to be shown globally at exhibitions at  Centre Pompidou, Paris; Tate Britain, London;  Bildmuseet Umeå, Sweden; Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum, Michigan; and The Museum of Modern Art, New York amongst others. Purple runs in The Curve from 6 October 2017 to 7 January 2018.

 

Text by CLOT Magazine (Twitter @clotmagazine)

 

Website www.barbican.org.uk/john-akomfrah-purple
(Photo courtesy of Barbican)

 

23 Oct 2017